Daily Legislative Brief From January 13, 2022

Legal & Judicial

SB 7014 – Relating to COVID-19-related Claims Against Health Care Providers

On Thursday, January 13, SB 7014, sponsored by the Senate Judiciary Committee, was heard by the Senate Rules Committee, and was reported favorable with 11 yeas and 5 nays. AIF’s Vice President of Governmental Affairs, Adam Basford, stood in support of this legislation.

The bill extends the length of time that health care providers receive liability protections from COVID-19-related claims. According to legislation passed during the 2021 Legislative Session, liability protections from COVID-19-related claims apply to claims accruing within 1 year after the effective date of the act, which was March 29, 2022. The bill extends the application period of the liability protections, making them applicable to claims accruing before June 1, 2023. The net result of the bill is to extend the liability protections for about 14 months, from March 29, 2022, to June 1, 2023.
SB 7014 will now go to the Senate floor for consideration.

AIF supports legislation that grants businesses the right to challenge in court unjust and arbitrary local ordinances that create barriers to business which leads to jobs lost and a decelerated economy. Business is the lifeblood of Florida and owners deserve the right to protect their livelihood.

Business Regulation

HB 569 – Relating to Business Damages Caused by Local Governments

On Thursday, January 13, HB 569 by Representative Lawrence McClure (R-Plant City) was heard by the House Civil Justice & Property Rights Subcommittee and was reported favorable with 12 yeas and 5 nays. AIF’s Vice President of Governmental Affairs, Adam Basford, stood in support of this legislation.

The bill creates a mechanism for a Florida business owner to recover business damages related to government action in specified circumstances. Specifically, the bill:

  • Entitles a business that has engaged in lawful business in Florida for at least three years to claim business damages if the county or municipality enacts or amends an ordinance or charter provision that will cause a reduction of at least 15% of the business’s profit;
  • Excludes specified ordinances and charter provisions from the scope of the bill, including certain emergency ordinances;
  • Authorizes one-way attorney fees and costs for a prevailing business and specifies the mechanism for calculating such fees and costs;
  • Specifies information that must be stated in a complaint for business damages and how the business damages determination will be made at trial.

HB 569 will now go to the House Local Administration and Veterans Affairs Subcommittee.

AIF supports legislation that grants businesses the right to challenge in court unjust and arbitrary local ordinances that create barriers to business which leads to jobs lost and a decelerated economy. Business is the lifeblood of Florida and owners deserve the right to protect their livelihood.